Hawaiian Ice

Suno Hawaiian Ice in Atlanta
Suno Hawaiian Ice in Atlanta
 
 

Want to be happy? If you ever visit Atlanta, Ga. be sure to make time for Hawaiian ice in this little corner ice cream shop. They have a facebook page, if you want to know more about the details, including locations.

…but let me tell you about this stuff, it isn’t the “Hawaiian ice” you are used to in most part of the continental US. It is shaved ice that is really smooth and of as fine a texture as the finest grained snow, with a bit of milky creaminess. Then there is a complete set of toppings, including fruits and green tea ice cream, if you want it.

Mmmmm, always makes me feel in a better mood, maybe because it reminds me of Maui. but it might just be the taste experience itself.

On Maui, the only difference is that you can order a coconut cream for the topping, but Suno’s might be superior on every other count! I feel better in this Midwest heat wave, just remembering how the giant bowl of soft fluffy ice and fresh fruit toppings gave refreshment on that super hot Atlanta day….

Ice Cream

When you can buy ice cream all year, sometimes you forget what a treat it can be, but the old fashioned home made type? Never! It is always special and always just the right thing to create on summer afternoon.

I’ve had to cut my calorie intake in the past few years, so if I indulge in calories I want that something to count as a luxurious event. Making your own ice cream counts.

I saw a Cuisinart ice cream maker on sale:

and for recipe ideas…

For those who want someone else to do their gourmet ice cream for them…. there is always Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams. But then you would miss out of the creative fun and ritual of home made.

Now that is what summer memories are made of!

Fresh Juicy Fruits In Season


Biting into a peach in August, one that has ripened on the tree and has sweet juices that fairly drip as you break the skin, or the burst of a sweet cherry in July, is more than taste. It is scent and feeling and experience of the season.

We often eat to lift a mood, but so often that is mindlessly with an approach that can leave us feeling less satisfied and poorer in experience than before. we also can buy fruits of all kinds throughout the year… but this is not the exciting pleasure of fruit in its season. There is so much more within a fruit that is ripening in its own time, well grown and eaten at a peak of readiness.

Each location for the cultivation of fruit has its own particular range of flavors, and when visiting those places it is always a highlight to taste the seasonal fruits of a place. I remember the breakfasts of mango, guava, and other more exotic fruits in Brazil. With their strong coffee and mild cheese it was the best way possible to start the day. In my own locale after recently finishing the sweet cherry season, the experience of the cherries bursting with juice and flavor fresh from the refrigerator was worthy of note. Taking ones sweet time in eating impressed the memory long afterwards.

Hurriedness is not how we should eat anything, but especially not a just-ripe, sun -filled, wonderful fruit. That is something that should be savored, delighting the eye, then the nose, and finally consuming with all the relish due a fine food.

Grapefruit

Lots of people don’t like grapefruit. My husband doesn’t, and my children don’t, but I really do. I like the refreshing, juicy taste with just that edge of bitter plus sweet that a ripe grapefruit has. The ones grown in Texas always seem to be best, which is why grocery shoppers just seem to scarf them up when they are available.

So since I like grapefruit, this post is for all those who share my enjoyment and want to learn a quick and easy way to section them, as well. This, in a video, was found via Granny Miller who is going to be on “work duty” with her farm. Spring is like that. What you don’t get done in Spring, often can’t get done otherwise.

Back to Grapefruit….. which got its name from how it grows in clusters on the tree:

  • Grapefruit is low in fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol.
  • It has about 1.3 grams of fiber per 1/2 cup. That is from about 2 fruits.
  • Grapefruit helps the body to absorb certain drugs.(Like cholesterol-lowering drugs)
  • The ideal storage temperature for fresh grapefruit is 50 °F
  • Naringin, a flavonoid compound, gives grapefruit its characteristic bitter flavor and blocks the uptake of fatty acids into cells
  • Ruby reds have lycopene which helps prevent the ‘bad’ (LDL) cholesterol from oxidizing and damaging artery walls… More Facts
  • Good source of vitamin C and potassium

Can’t leave you without a delicious recipe. This one from Martha Stewart:
Ingredients

Red Grapefruit and Fennel Salad Serves 6.

* 3 ruby-red grapefruit
* 1/4 teaspoon whole fennel seeds
* 1 teaspoon honey
* 1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
* Salt and freshly ground black pepper
* 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
* 1 small red onion
* 1 small fennel bulb
* 8 ounces baby spinach or watercress

Directions

1. Using a paring knife, remove peel, pith, and outer membranes from 2 grapefruit. Slice into 1/4-inch rounds; set aside. Squeeze juice from remaining grapefruit, and set aside.
2. Place fennel seeds in a skillet over medium-high heat. Cook until golden brown and fragrant, about 3 minutes. Transfer to a spice grinder, and grind until very fine.
3. Place ground seeds in a bowl; add 1/4 cup grapefruit juice, honey, and mustard. Season with salt and pepper. Whisk to combine, slowly adding olive oil. Set dressing aside.
4. Using a mandoline or sharp knife, slice onion into thin rounds; place in a bowl. Pour remaining grapefruit juice over onions; toss.
5. Cut fennel in half lengthwise; remove core. Using mandoline, slice fennel. Drain onions; place in a large bowl. Add fennel, spinach, and grapefruit rounds. Toss with dressing.
OR this very simple one:
Ingredients

* 1 large ruby pink grapefruit
* 3 navel oranges or a combination of naval oranges, blood oranges, mandarin oranges and/or tangerines
* 1/4 cup honey
* 2 Tbsp fresh lime or lemon juice
* 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamon

Directions

Peel the fruit. Cut away the membranes of the individual segments with a sharp knife. Collect the peeled segments in a bowl.

Drain off any excess juice from the fruit into a small saucepan. Add the lime juice, honey, and cardamom to the saucepan. Bring to a boil and reduce heat to low. Simmer for 10 minutes and then remove from heat and let cool to room temp. Pour over fruit mixture and gently fold in so that all the fruit is coated. Let stand for 15 minutes or chill until ready to serve.

Apple Butter

While making a trek into Hocking Hills country I stopped and picked up some Laurelville homemade apple butter. If you haven’t tasted apple butter that is made with the taste of all outdoors, cooked in the open over a wood fire…well, you have missed out on something truly special.

My grandmother always had a jar of this treat on the breakfast table, and I well remember the smooth spiced brown apple butter that we put on fresh bread toast points with our soft boiled eggs in egg cups. My grandfather would read us a selection from “Our Daily Bread” and then we would dig into this homey and sustaining breakfast repast. It was such a good memory to take through the years, and the delicious taste of real homemade apple butter always resurrects it in my mind.

This might be close, Apple Butter: McCutcheons 4 Pack, but I would look for a roadside farm market or stand – or maybe you have apple butter festivals going on near you ?

Tahitian Limeade Recipe

Why Surfers Get Salt and Lemonade Cravings « Coconut Girl Wireless

Tahitian Limeade is as simple as making a limeade and adding some coconut water. If you live on a Hawaiian island you can pick up cold, ready made containers of it at health food stores, but if you are a Mainlander you can buy the coconut water (be sure it isn’t coconut milk), make your own limeade and add the touch of coconut. Chill. Close your eyes and pretend you are on a beach in Maui. Play some ocean sounds in the background….Follow this recipe from Coconut Girl (with lime juice instead of lemon)

• I pick 2-3 of the biggest, most yellow lemons off the tree. Roll them on the wood cutting board or counter top so they’re easier to juice.

• In saucepan, with approximately one cup of purified water, medium heat, add approximately two medium scoops (maybe 1/3 cup) of raw sugar. Heat only ’til sugar can dissolve while stirring – quickly remove from heat. Of course, while this is heating you’re going to…

• Cut lemons in half. Using a citrus juicer (cheap electric ones work fine, though if you’re rich go use your fancy industrial strength citrus press), juice all 4-6 halves (if your lemons are small add one more and/or one small lime for flavor). Should take all of two minutes!• As for the sugar mixture, add a few ice cubes -preferably made from pure (or de-chlorinated) water- to cool it down. Pour it into a glass measuring cup, then squirt some agave into the mix (approx. 1 tablespoon but who’s measuring) and stir that in. Then mix in a healthy pinch of Real Salt™, Himalayan Crystal Salt or pure sea salt (Hawai’ian Specialty Salt -based in Hilo- works). Once it’s blended add a handful more ice cubes to cool it to approximately room temp.

• It’s important to not heat the lemon juice! So, pour the juice into an empty glass lemonade jar or use a pitcher if you’re going to serve it. Add some cold or room temp purified water, then add the sugar water / syrup you made. Then fill the rest of the jar with more water to taste. Chill.

Lemonade


Nothing is more refreshing to me, or says summer, than a tall cold glass of lemonade… unless, of course, you make it a limeade. I’ll take both, thank you! Or either, or if I could find it on the mainland…. one of Maui’s Limeades with a touch of coconut from the Hawaiian Moons health food grocery. Now that was bliss, sitting oceanside sipping the chilled Tahitian limeade slowly while watching the waves lap the shore.

When I was a little girl I once had one of those lemonade stands one summer. I don’t think I made any money (probably ’cause every other kid on the block had the same idea!), but it was fun…. you get to drink up whatever didn’t go to customers. Or maybe that was why no profits were seen! but of all the drinks possible… ice teas, cold sodas, and all the others, it is still lemonade that is the queen of all summer drinks for me.

How to Make One Glass of Lemonade on eHow is the simplest recipe ever:
* One glass of water (about 8 oz)
* One small or 1/2 large lemon
* Sugar

Squeeze juice into water add sugar and stir til dissolved.

Some refinements to that recipe are ….”2 tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar in a 12-ounce glass one-half full of crushed ice. Now cut a lemon in two, slice each section in two or three pieces, add the juice of the lemon and fill the glass with plain ice-cold water. Shake throughly, pour from shaker into glass, and serve with straws”

Or maybe serve friends:
* 6 lemons
* 1 cup white sugar
* 6 cups cold water

1. Juice the lemons to make 1 cup of juice. To make your labor easier, FIRMLY roll the lemons between your hand and counter top before cutting in half and juicing.
2. In a gallon pitcher combine 1 cup lemon juice, 1 cup sugar, and 6 cups cold water. Stir. Adjust water to taste. Chill and serve over ice.
=======
Did you know “lemonade was sold by licensed vendors on the streets of Paris as early as 1676” ? Reputedly the most popular refreshment in the 1880’s here in America, I remember Laura Ingalls Wilder writing of it.

The pithy and well known adage, “When life gives you lemons, make lemonade” holds the simple secret of making the best of what you have, but gives little glimpse of the supreme pleasure of ice cold lemonade on a hot summer’s day.

Russian Chai, and other teaspoons of cheer

Russian Chai

Russian Tea


Russian Tea Framed Art Print

Wiles, Irving R.
Buy at AllPosters.com

The Russian word for tea is Chai, and I will always remember it. When I was in St.Petersburg, I found that tea was everywhere and seemed to be more favored than coffee. I spent my week in St.Petersburg during a very cold November, and every restaurant was quick to offer tea. In Russia, they brew their tea thick and hot and pour it into small glasses. I had thought that England or India would have been the capitol of tea, but not so. The Russians thrive on it, and while viewing one of the most beautiful sunsets in the world in one of the most spectacular cities to be seen, with a cool chill moving across the sky, a drink of this Russian Chai completed everything.

-H.S. Bailey

Want to make your own Chai?

Baharat (Spices) and Cay (Tea) for Sale, Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey


Baharat (Spices) and Cay (Tea) for Sale, Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
Framed Photographic Print

Buy at AllPosters.com

Try this recipe:

Hindi Chai
Indian Spiced Tea

2 green cardamom pods
1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon
Generous dash or two ground cloves
1-inch piece of fresh ginger, grated or finely chopped (optional)
1 cup milk
1 cup water
1-1/2 Tbs. sugar
2 heaping tsp. black tea or 2 tea bags

Lightly crush the cardamom pods in a mortar, to release their fragrance. Alternately, you can crush them with a rolling pin—but do it on a piece of waxed paper or plastic wrap, so it’s easy to collect. Do not completely powder the cardamom, however, as this can discolor the tea.

In a saucepan, combine the spices, milk, and water. Bring to a boil over high heat (watch the pot carefully —boiling milk boils over more quickly than just about anything else you can cook), then reduce the heat to low and simmer, uncovered, for 2 minutes. Add the sugar and tea and continue to simmer for about 1 minute longer, or until the tea has clearly released its color into the liquid.

Strain into cups and serve at once. Alternatively, you can let the strained tea cool to room temperature, then pour it over ice.

Serves 2. Enjoy.
Chai recipe from the Chicago Mensa Site

Learn more about the terms used in ‘tea culture’:

Tea Glossary

…for tea, though ridiculed by those who are naturally coarse in their
nervous sensibilities, or are become so from wine-drinking, and are not susceptible of influence from so refined a stimulant, will always be the favored beverage of the intellectual…
-Thomas De Quincy

There you go….. smart people prefer tea;)

Popsicles, Italian Ices, Smoothies

These are a few of my favorite things…. all year, but especially for warm weather months. It helps if they have real fruit juices as their ingredients, and no cholesterol! Luigi’s are a favorite brand with flavors like lemon, pina colada, and mango; but Edy made some that were very good, too.

If you see those little “Rita’s Italian Ice stands” those are great! I favor the mango, so I haven’t tried alot of the other flavors, but it is a nice place to stop on a summer evening, or the middle of a hot day, taking a break from errands.

I have an inexpensive little ice shaver that I use to make my own smoothies at home- using frozen fruits. I think there is something refreshing and relaxing about eating icy treats. As much as I like ice cream it is better for the waistline ( what waistline?!!) to enjoy the Italian ices. Fruit popsicles are just as good, I like Edy’s brand best for these, although there are some other good ones out there in the marketplace.

Quick, cool, and sweet… they are just a cheerful treat that refresh the day.

Tea Quotes


“When the girl returned, some hours later, she carried a tray, with a cup of fragrant tea steaming on it; and a plate piled up with very hot buttered toast, cut thick, very brown on both sides, with the butter running through the holes in it in great golden drops, like honey from the honeycomb. The smell of that buttered toast simply talked to Toad, and with no uncertain voice; talked of warm kitchens, of breakfasts on bright frosty mornings, of cosy parlour firesides on winter evenings, when one’s ramble was over and slippered feet were propped on the fender, of the purring of contented cats, and the twitter of sleepy canaries.”
The Wind in the Willows, by Kenneth Grahame

“The Russian word for tea is Chai, and I will always remember it. When I was in St.Petersburg, I found that tea was everywhere and seemed to be more favored than coffee. I spent my week in St.Petersburg during a very cold November, and every resturant was quick to offer tea. In Russia, they brew their tea thick and hot and pour it into small glasses. I had thought that England or India would have been the capitol of tea, but not so. The Russians thrive on it, and while viewing one of the most beautiful sunsets in the world in one of the most spectacular cities to be seen, with a cool chill moving across the sky, a drink of this Russian Chai completed everything.”
-H.S. Bailey

Want to make your own Chai?
Try this recipe:

Hindi Chai
Indian Spiced Tea

2 green cardamom pods
1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon
Generous dash or two ground cloves
1-inch piece of fresh ginger, grated or finely chopped (optional)
1 cup milk
1 cup water
1-1/2 Tbs. sugar
2 heaping tsp. black tea or 2 tea bags

Lightly crush the cardamom pods in a mortar, to release their fragrance. Alternately, you can crush them with a rolling pin—but do it on a piece of waxed paper or plastic wrap, so it’s easy to collect. Do not completely powder the cardamom, however, as this can discolor the tea.

In a saucepan, combine the spices, milk, and water. Bring to a boil over high heat (watch the pot carefully —boiling milk boils over more quickly than just about anything else you can cook), then reduce the heat to low and simmer, uncovered, for 2 minutes. Add the sugar and tea and continue to simmer for about 1 minute longer, or until the tea has clearly released its color into the liquid.

Strain into cups and serve at once. Alternatively, you can let the strained tea cool to room temperature, then pour it over ice.

Serves 2. Enjoy.
~from the Chicago Mensa Site

More Hot Soup

“Good soup is one of the prime ingredients of good living. For soup can do more to lift the spirits and stimulate the appetite than any other one dish.”
Louis P. De Gouy, The Soup Book (1949)

“Soup is cuisine’s kindest course. It breathes reassurance; it steams consolation; after a weary day it promotes sociability, as the five o’clock cup of tea or the cocktail hour.”
Louis P. De Gouy, The Soup Book (1949)

“I live on good soup, not on fine words.”
Moliere

It was one of those mornings when a man could face the day only after warming himself with a mug of thick coffee beaded with steam, a good thick crust of bread, and a bowl of bean soup. – Richard Gehman, The Haphazard Gourmet (1966)

Fresh Baked Bread

fresh bread

The smell of fresh-baked bread is a happy thought, and a bite of a slice spread with butter is even better.

A saying:

Rye bread will do you good,
Barley bread will do you no harm,
Wheaten bread will sweeten your blood,
Oaten bread will strengthen your arm.

Fresh Baked Oat Bread

Ingredients

  • 3 cups Flour
  • ¾ cups Oats (instant or old fashioned)
  • 2¼ teaspoons Instant yeast
  • 1½ teaspoons salt
  • 1 cup milk
  • ¼ cup Warm water
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • ¼ cup honey
  • 3 tablespoons honey, warmed slightly
  • 2 Tablespoons Old Fashioned Oats

Instructions

  1. In your Kitchen Aid, Bosch or in a large mixing bowl combine the Oats, Flour, Yeast and Salt.
  2. Heat your milk and butter until melted. Allow to cool until warm. Then stir in the honey and water.
  3. Add the liquid mixture to the dry mixture until it comes together to form a dough. Knead by hand or with a dough hook on your mixer for 10 minutes, until the dough is smooth and elastic.
  4. Place your dough in a oiled bowl. Cover and let rise until double in size (45 to 60 minutes).
  5. Shape into loaf and place it into a 9x5 loaf pan. Cover with a towel and allow to double.
  6. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Add an empty pot or pan to the lower rack to heat up. Bring 2 cups water to a boil and add to pan.
  7. When your loaf is raised to double the size, heat up your honey and spread a layer over the top. Sprinkle with topping of oats.
  8. Bake in oven for 40-50 minutes until the bread is a nice dark golden brown.
  9. Remove from pan and cool completely before eating.

Freshly baked Honey oat bread sounds like a perfect weekend treat. Recipe from Karrie.

Hot Cup On A Cold Day


There is something so uplifting about having a cup of tea. It is especially enjoyable in a beautiful china cup with a side of cookies. One of those small joys of the day

Find yourself a cup; the teapot is behind you. Now tell me about hundreds of things


Tea Mind

Humilitea, Possibilitea, Qualitea, Solidaritea, Abilitea, Equalitea,
Individualitea, Serenitea, Insanitea, Confidentialitea, Vitalitea,
Creativitea, Sportea, Claritea, Realitea
Activitea, Longevitea, Impossibilitea, Familiaritea, Humanitea, Puritea,
Levitea, Longevitea, Immunitea, Digestabilitea, Electricitea, Sensualitea,
Femininitea, Festivitea

-Adapted from: Letters to a Young Zentrepenur – The Republic of Tea

A Perfect Evening

Tea pot is on, the cups are waiting,

Favorite chairs anticipating,

No matter what I have to do,

My friend there’s always time for you.

-author unknown



Come and share a pot of tea, my home is warm and my friendship’s free.

~ Emilie Barnes, If Teacups Could Talk